Is Building on London’s Green Belt Inevitable?

Is Building on London’s Green Belt Inevitable?

Enfield Borough wants to increase the number of homes to be built on Green Belt land from 5,000 to 9,000.  The plan has drawn opposition from the local civic society and from CPRE London, but it has also gained support from other, possibly unexpected directions.

Are the alternatives realistic/deliverable?  What about infrastructure provision?  There are many questions – but where to look for answers?

As the pressure to use Green Belt land is unlikely to be restricted to Enfield alone, the London Forum is holding an Open Meeting on January 16. to give the topic a thorough airing.

Mike Kiely, Chair of the Planning Officers Society will ask the big questions about the current policy for developing in the Green Belt within London,  and whether the “exceptional circumstances” required to justify building there are likely to be invoked more frequently in the future.

The Enfield Society’s Dave Cockle and John West will present the work they have done on alternatives to development on Enfield’s Green Belt.

Economist, Samuel Watling, speaking on behalf of Priced Out will argue that the definition of Green Belt is largely arbitrary, and a product of political choices, and that development opportunities on Green Belt land should be considered on their merits.

CPRE London’s Alice Roberts will make the case that such incursions as that mooted for Enfield are neither necessary nor desirable.

Following a short break for light refreshments, members of the audience will be invited to make comments and put questions to the speakers.

To attend please book your place.

Date

16 Jan 2024
Expired!

Time

6pm for 6.30pm
18:00 - 21:00

Location

The Gallery, Alan Baxter Cowcross
The Gallery, Alan Baxter Cowcross, 77 Cowcross Street, London, EC1M 6EL
Website
https://alanbaxter.co.uk/the-alan-baxter-gallery

Organiser

London Forum
Phone
020 7993 5754
Email
events@londonforum.org.uk

The London Forum of Amenity and Civic Societies

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